The Healthy Eating Placemat:A Visual Guide To Healthy Eating

A place to get your questions answered from McDougall staff dietitian, Jeff Novick, MS, RDN.

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The Healthy Eating Placemat:A Visual Guide To Healthy Eating

Postby JeffN » Sat Jun 15, 2013 10:39 am

The Five Pillars of Healthy Eating
"A Common Sense Approach To Nutrition"


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The Five Pillars of Healthy Eating
"A Common Sense Approach To Nutrition"

1) Plant-Centered - Center your plate and your diet predominately around plant foods (fruits, vegetables, starchy vegetables, roots/tubers, intact whole grains, and legumes (beans, peas & lentils).

2) Minimally Processed - Enjoy foods as close to "as grown in nature" with minimal processing that does not detract from the nutritional value &/or add in any harmful components.

3) Calorie Dilute - Follow the principles of calorie density choosing foods that are calorie adequate, satiating and nutrient sufficient.

4) Low S-O-S - Avoid/minimize the use of added Salts/sodium, Oils/Fats and Sugars/sweeteners

5) Variety - Consume a variety of foods in each of the recommended food groups.
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Re: The Healthy Eating Placemat:A Visual Guide To Healthy Ea

Postby JeffN » Tue May 20, 2014 6:59 am

The Principles of Calorie Density: A Common Sense Approach to Sound Nutrition
Jeff Novick, MS, RD

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The Principles of Calorie Density

1) Hunger & Satiety - Whenever hungry, eat until you are comfortably full. Don't starve and don't stuff yourself.

2) Sequence Your Meals - Start all meals with a salad, soup and/or fruit. By starting with the foods that are lowest in calorie density, you begin to fill up for fewer calories.

3) Don't Drink Your Calories - Avoid liquid calories. Eat/chew your calories, don't drink or liquefy them. Liquids have little if any satiety so they do not fill you up as much as solid foods of equal calories.

4) Dilution is the Solution (the 50/50 guideline) - Dilute Out High Calorie Dense Foods/Meals - Dilute the calorie density of your meals by filling 1/2 your plate (by visual volume) with intact whole grains, starchy vegetables and/or legumes and the other half with non-starchy vegetables and/or fruit.

5) Be Aware of the Impact of Vegetables vs Fat/Oil - Non-starchy vegetables are the lowest in calorie density while fat and oil are the highest. Therefore, adding non-starchy vegetables to any dish will always lower the overall calorie density of a meal while adding fat and oil will always raise the overall calorie density of a meal.

6) Limit High Calorie Dense Foods - Limit (or avoid) foods that are higher in calorie density. These include dried fruit, high fat plant foods (nuts, seeds, avocados), processed whole grains (breads, bagels, crackers, dry cereal, tortilla's, popcorn, etc). If you use them, incorporate them into meals that are made up of low calorie dense foods and think of them as a condiment to the meal. For example, add a few slices of avocado added to a large salad, or a few walnuts or raisins added in a bowl of oatmeal and fruit.

In addition, include about 30-60 minutes of activity a day (including some aerobic, resistance and flexibility exercise), aim for a BMI of around 18.5-22 and get enough sleep, rest, relaxation, recreation, fresh air, pure water, etc and enjoy life!

http://www.jeffnovick.com/RD/Interview_2012.html

Right now we are all bombarded with every kind of vegan or plant-based diet in the world. How would you capsulize Jeff Novick’s diet?

I have really been thinking about that lately and how best to describe the principles of a healthy diet, and I think, plant-centered, minimally processed, calorie dilute, low SOS really sums it up. It’s not just vegan, vegetarian or plant-based because one could have a pretty bad vegan, vegetarian or plant-based diet. So I like to say “plant- centered” but I also add that it should be minimally processed. I don’t say “whole” or “unprocessed” as not all processing is bad. Processing per se isn’t what’s hurtful, it’s processing that either detracts from the value of the food (i.e., refining) or adds something that is potentially harmful, (i.e., salt, sugar, etc.). So plant-centered, minimally processed, and then calorie dilute, because so much food has become so calorie dense which is a major contributing factor for obesity and many other diseases. The fourth principle is a diet low in SOS, which is salt, oil/fat and sugar. Even if you have a plant-centered, minimally processed, calorie-dilute diet and you cover it with salt, sugar, and oil, it is not healthy. I’m not going to say none, but low, as it isn’t all or nothing.
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Passive Overconsumption:The Unintended Intake of Excess Calo

Postby JeffN » Sat Aug 02, 2014 8:09 am

Passive Overconsumption: The Unintended Intake of Excess Calories
Jeff Novick, MS, RDN

Have you ever ended up eating more calories then you intended? There are certain aspects of food that, when we eat till we are comfortably full, result in the unintended consumption of excess calories. This is called, Passive Overconsumption. We did not intend to overeat, but we did. Being aware of these aspects of food can help us minimize the potential to over consume calories. As you can see, these go right along with all of the principles of calorie density and there is some overlap to them.

Here are 10 factors that lead to passive overconsumption,

1. Higher Calorie Dense Foods
As the calorie density of the food goes up the more likely we are to over consume calories, especially as the calorie density goes over 700-1000 calories per pound. On a whole food, plant-based diet (WFPB), the foods that are over 1000 cal/lb are bread products (breads, bagels, crackers, dry cereals, tortilla's), dried/dry fruit, nuts, seeds and oils.


2. Higher Fat Foods
As the percentage of calories from fat goes up, the more likely we are to over consume calories, especially from added fats/oils. Adding fat/oil to food increase the overall percentage of calories from fat and the overall calorie density and decreases the overall satiety (per calorie). On a WFPB, the foods that are higher in fat are peanuts, soybeans, avocados, nuts, seeds and oils.


3. Liquid Calories
Liquid calories provide little to no satiety for their calorie load so they do not fill you up as much as solid foods of equal calories. For example, is much easier to over consume calories when consuming fruit juice, than the whole fruit. On a whole food, plant based diet, the most common liquid calories are fruit and vegetable juices and non-dairy milks.


4. Added Free Sugars
Free sugars are high in calorie density and low in satiety. As the percentage of calories from added free sugars in a food goes up, the more likely we are to over consume calories. Adding free sugars to food increase the overall calorie density and decreases the overall satiety (per calorie). This includes all added free sugars even those considered unrefined and/or natural like maple syrup, molasses, etc.


5. Flour (Bread) Products
Most all flour (bread) products are high in calorie density and low in satiety even if they are made from unrefined whole grains. On a WFPB diet, these foods include bread products (bread, bagels, dry cereal, crackers, tortillas) and baked chips.


6. Dry/Dried Foods
Food that is dried (&/or drier) and low in water have an increased calorie density and tend to be lower in satiety. On a WFPB diet, the foods that are dried/dry are dried fruits (raising, prunes), and naturally dry fruits (dates), bread products (bread, bagels, dry cereal, crackers, tortillas), baked chips, puffed cereals and popcorn.


7. Emulsifying, Pureeing, & Blending
Blending foods disrupts the fiber and reduces the satiety of the food. On the other hand, chewing food increases satiety. Examples of blended foods on a WFPB diet include smoothies, dried fruit/nut confections.


8. Hyper-Palatable Foods.
Foods that have been salted, sweetened or sauced stimulate the appetite and lead to over consumption. Reduce or greatly eliminate any added sugar, salt and/or oil/fat.


9. Vanishing Perceived Satiety
These are foods that appear to be high in satiety due to their large volume but are actually calorie dense and low in satiety. This is because their volume comes from air, which unlike water, does not provide the same weight for the same volume so is much less satiating. On a WFPB diet, foods that have vanishing perceived satiety include popcorn, rice cakes and puffed cereals.


10. Ultra Processed Foods
Ultra processed foods tend to be high in fat, calorie density, added salt/sodium, added sugar/sweeteners, refind flours and oil/fat, and low in fiber, water and satiety and so are easy to over eat on. Avoid ultra processed foods.
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Re: The Healthy Eating Placemat:A Visual Guide To Healthy Ea

Postby JeffN » Sun Dec 20, 2015 5:40 pm

Kenden, who runs the Jewish Food Hero blog where I was just interviewed, designed this beautiful version of The Healthy Eating Placemat. Feel free to share both.

Here is a link to the interview and a PDF of the Healthy Eating Placemat they designed

http://jewishfoodhero.com/an-interview- ... #more-2930

In Health
Jeff
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Re: The Healthy Eating Placemat:A Visual Guide To Healthy Ea

Postby JeffN » Tue Apr 12, 2016 6:59 pm

Besides the points made in the study, this is why in the discussion of the pleasure trap trigger foods, I suggested that people struggle so much with flour products (breads, bagels, crackers, tortillas, dry cereals etc) as they are one of the leading contributors of salt in the diet.

viewtopic.php?f=22&t=48760

3) Salt - we know salt is a trigger and while not on the list of options, most people don’t realize that bread products are one of the leading contributor (If not the leading contributor) of salt to the diet. Its part of the basic bread recipe and baking powder/soda (very common ingredients) are about 50% salt. While we know to eat nuts salt free, salt free is hard to find in regard to flour/bread products. I only know of 1 or 2 breads, tortila’s, pita’s etc that are truly salt free. So, eat flour/bread, get a big salt hit too. Not many people would choose to eat just flour and water as a cracker or as bread. The percentage of people picking bread might be lower if the only breads available were salt free. Bread can also be source of sugar and also oil. "


In Health
Jeff


Salt Promotes Passive Overconsumption of Dietary Fat in Humans.
Bolhuis DP, Costanzo A, Newman LP, Keast RS.
J Nutr. 2016 Apr;146(4):838-45. doi: 10.3945/jn.115.226365. Epub 2016 Mar 2.
PMID: 26936134
http://sci-hub.io/10.3945/jn.115.226365

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Excess fat consumption has been linked to the development of obesity. Fat and salt are a common and appetitive combination in food; however, the effect of either on food intake is unclear. Fat taste sensitivity has been negatively associated with dietary fat intake, but how fat taste sensitivity influences the intake of fat within a meal has, to our knowledge, not yet been investigated.

OBJECTIVES:

Our objectives were, first, to investigate the effects of both fat and salt on ad libitum food intake and, second, to investigate the effects of fat taste sensitivity on satiation responses to fat and whether this was affected by salt.

METHODS:

Forty-eight healthy adults [16 men and 32 women, aged 18-54 y, body mass index (kg/m(2)): 17.8-34.4] were recruited and their fat taste sensitivity was measured by determination of the detection threshold of oleic acid (18:1n-6). In a randomized 2 × 2 crossover design, participants attended 4 lunchtime sessions after a standardized breakfast. Meals consisted of elbow macaroni (56%) with sauce (44%); sauces were manipulated to be1) low-fat (0.02% fat, wt:wt)/low-salt (0.06% NaCl, wt:wt),2) low-fat/high-salt (0.5% NaCl, wt:wt),3) high-fat (34% fat, wt:/wt)/low-salt, or4) high-fat/high-salt. Ad libitum intake (primary outcome) and eating rate, pleasantness, and subjective ratings of hunger and fullness (secondary outcomes) were measured.

RESULTS:

Salt increased food and energy intakes by 11%, independent of fat concentration (P= 0.022). There was no effect of fat on food intake (P= 0.6), but high-fat meals increased energy intake by 60% (P< 0.001). A sex × fat interaction was found (P= 0.006), with women consuming 15% less by weight of the high-fat meals than the low-fat meals. Fat taste sensitivity was negatively associated with the intake of high-fat meals but only in the presence of low salt (fat taste × salt interaction on delta intake of high-fat - low-fat meals;P= 0.012).

CONCLUSIONS:

The results suggest that salt promotes passive overconsumption of energy in adults and that salt may override fat-mediated satiation in individuals who are sensitive to the taste of fat. This trial was registered at the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (http://www.anzctr.org.au) as ACTRN12615000048583.
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Re: The Healthy Eating Placemat:A Visual Guide To Healthy Ea

Postby JeffN » Mon Feb 19, 2018 11:50 am

A 10-POINT CHECKLIST FOR MAXIMUM WEIGHT LOSS (MWL)

1) Start each meal with a soup and/or salad and/or fruit.  

2) Follow the 50/50 plate method for your meals, filling half your plate (by visual volume) with non-starchy vegetables and 50% (by visual volume) with minimally processed starches.

2) Choose fruit for desert.

3) Greatly reduce of eliminate added sugars and added salts.  This includes gourmet sugars and salts too.  If either is troublesome for you, you can eliminate them.

4) Eliminate all animal foods (dairy, meat, eggs, fish, seafood).

5) Eliminate all higher fat plant foods (i.e., nuts, seeds, avocados, tofu, soy).

6) Eliminate any added oil.

7) Eliminate all higher calorie-dense foods including flour products (i.e. bread, bagels, muffins, crackers, dry cereals, cookies, cakes), puffed cereals, air-popped popcorn and dried fruit.

8 ) Don’t drink your calories (especially from juices & sugar-sweetened beverages).

9) Follow these principles, eating whenever you are hungry until you are comfortably full.   Don't starve yourself and don't stuff yourself.

10) Avoid being sedentary and aim for at least 30 minutes or more of moderate exercise daily (i.e., brisk walking).
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