You must pour oil on your salad!?!?

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You must pour oil on your salad!?!?

Postby Leif Varmark » Wed Jun 20, 2012 8:17 am

Yeah - fat helps the absorption, but how much fat?

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... an+Diet%29
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Re: You must pour oil on your salad!?!?

Postby nonyabizz » Wed Jun 20, 2012 8:54 am

This study compares different traditional salad dressings.

It is not applicable here, as no one here espouses the use of oil at all.
Peace:)

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Re: You must pour oil on your salad!?!?

Postby jay kaye » Wed Jun 20, 2012 9:03 am

Leif Varmark wrote:Yeah - fat helps the absorption, but how much fat?

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... an+Diet%29


Not really necessary for those who eat a plant strong diet, but since you asked:

How much, from your cited article 3 grams of oil. THAT is 1/10 of an of an ounce or a few drops of oil. The best way to do this is NOT to add any oil, but chop up 1 black walnut (2 halves) and top your salad. This will also proved all the daily requirements of Omega EFA for about 30 calories.

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Re: You must pour oil on your salad!?!?

Postby Leif Varmark » Wed Jun 20, 2012 9:29 am

Sorry - don't know how my post ended up here in »The Lounge«. I thought I wrote it in the »Jeff Novick«-thread...

I would like to know why a study can be so wrong. I try once more to hit Jeff...

I must be butter-fingered, though I don't eat any oil/fat/butter...
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Re: You must pour oil on your salad!?!?

Postby John McDougall » Wed Jun 20, 2012 9:56 am

Old News:

(But people love to hear good news about their bad habits)

See my August 2006 newsletter:

Adding Avocados or Oils to Salads Aids Absorption of Nutrients—More Good News about Bad Habits

Findings from a study of 11 subjects published in 2005 on the benefits of eating oily foods have resurfaced (Wednesday, August 09, 2006; by Tara Parker-Pope, The Wall Street Journal).1 This revived story is based on an article titled, Carotenoid absorption from salad and salsa by humans is enhanced by the addition of avocado or avocado oil by Nuray Unlu, published in the Journal of Nutrition. The researchers found that, “adding avocado fruit can significantly enhance carotenoid absorption from salad and salsa, which is attributed primarily to the lipids present in avocado.”2 The research was funded by the California Avocado Commission. Half an avocado was as effective at enhancing absorption as a whole avocado. One avocado was estimated to contain 24 grams of oil. Pure avocado oil (24 grams) was also tested and found to be as effective as the whole avocado.

Comments:

In my forty-year career as a medical doctor, I have never seen any diseases due to deficiency of carotenoids in a patient—ever. But every day I see hundreds of people in shopping centers and on the street suffering from diseases due to fat excess. Therefore, even faced with the findings of this study, my recommendations to limit fats and oils will remain the same. For healthy, trim people I have always said unprocessed, high-fat foods, like avocados, nuts, seeds and olives, can be a delicious addition to their diet—and may be important for those with high calories needs, such as athletes and active children.

Our requirements for essential fats are very small—no more than 0.5 gram daily. Only plants can synthesize essential fats—so eating plant-foods is the obvious source of these necessary nutrients. Because body fats (adipose tissue) store these essential fats efficiently, even if overweight people were placed on an artificially manufactured fat-free diet, they would have little risk of becoming deficient in essential fats over their entire lifetime. Note: a diet made of unprocessed plant foods, like the McDougall diet, naturally contains about 7% of its calories as fat—and about half the total fat found in plant foods is of the essential variety—the kind we need

People struggling to lose excess body weight will want to avoid all high fat foods and especially oils—the fat you eat is the fat you wear. Optimum absorption of nutrients has been reported to occur with as little as 3 grams of added fats (27 calories) per meal.2 In this experiment, where people consumed whole avocados or the oil extract, they ate 21 grams of fat which translates into 189 extra calories per meal.

There is a big difference between fats consumed in their natural packages as avocados, nuts, seeds, and olives; and fats consumed as extracted oils. Fats found in foods are combined with other essential nutrients (vitamins, minerals, fibers, and thousands of important phytochemicals). These naturally balanced combinations allow the fats to safely and efficiently work when they enter the cells of your body. Free fats, stripped away from the other ingredients found in grains, fruits, seeds or nuts, become medicines, at best, and toxins, at worst. Consuming free vegetable oils easily makes people fat, and the fats suppress the immune system (increasing the risk of cancer and infection), and encourage bleeding. These free oils easily spoil, becoming rancid—a condition where harmful free radicals are plentiful.

Low-fat plant foods provide all the carotenoids the body needs. Consider the possibility that an excess of these nutrients caused by adding avocados and other oils to a low-fat meal may result in nutritional imbalances that encourage disease. It is possible.

If you want to believe that there is a health advantage from more nutrients entering your body, then at least act conservatively. For maximum carotenoid absorption the amount of fat required is as little as 1/7th of an avocado—about a tablespoonful per meal. Also heating and blending fruits and vegetables enhance nutrient absorption3—and these are much safer approaches than stuffing your overweight self with fat.

1) http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/06221/712211-114.stm

2) Unlu NZ, Bohn T, Clinton SK, Schwartz SJ. Carotenoid absorption from salad and salsa by humans is enhanced by the addition of avocado or avocado oil. J Nutr. 2005 Mar;135(3):431-6.

3) Brown MJ, Ferruzzi MG, Nguyen ML, Cooper DA, Eldridge AL, Schwartz SJ, White WS. Carotenoid bioavailability is higher from salads ingested with full-fat than with fat-reduced salad dressings as measured with electrochemical detection.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Aug;80(2):396-403.
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Re: You must pour oil on your salad!?!?

Postby Adrienne » Wed Jun 20, 2012 2:10 pm

Jeff's comments here might be helpful:
viewtopic.php?f=22&t=5939

That is actually one of my favorite Jeff threads, and I've read all of them!
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Re: You must pour oil on your salad!?!?

Postby JeffN » Wed Jun 20, 2012 7:34 pm

And check out this one,

viewtopic.php?f=22&t=27515&p=274666

In Health
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Re: You must pour oil on your salad!?!?

Postby kittyadventures » Thu Jun 21, 2012 7:51 am

thanks Dr McDougall and Jeff for addressing this issue. Funny how many people take that study about avacados abd extend it out to be all oils. now I know what to say to people who throw that at me.

I am always surprised at how people including me, cling to their consumption of oils.
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Re: You must pour oil on your salad!?!?

Postby theresaann » Fri Jun 21, 2013 2:55 pm

Older thread, but right on. Dr. Campbells new book, "Whole," talks about this, right? Breaking down microdetails and magnifying their significance as solo factors, instead of realizing nutrition is really a symphony experience, many parts interacting in a way that just can't be quantified.
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