Protein requirements

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Protein requirements

Postby Gwen » Wed Jul 16, 2008 5:57 pm

Hi Jeff,
How many grams of protein do we need each day?
Thanks,
Gwen
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Re: Protein requirements

Postby JeffN » Thu Jul 17, 2008 8:41 am

Gwen wrote:Hi Jeff,
How many grams of protein do we need each day?
Thanks,
Gwen


Hi Gwen,

I don't know! :)

But then again, neither does anyone else. :)

All nutrient recommendation are given in relation to the needs that will cover over 98% of the population over time and therefore include built in safety margins for most people. None of them ever represent the actual daily needs of any one person.

The only way to know the actual protein needs of any one person on any given day is to do a nitrogen balance study. But, realize that whatever your needs where today, they may be different tomorrow.

In regard to national recommendations...

According to the National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine,

http://books.nap.edu/openbook.php?recor ... 0&page=589

"The Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for both men and women is 0.80 g of good quality protein/kg body weight/d and is based on careful analysis of available nitrogen balance studies."

For a 150 lb person, this would equate to about 55 grams

As a percentage of energy, from

From the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs): Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Ranges Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine, National Academies

Protein 10–35% of calories.

On an 1800 calorie diet, 10% would equate to 45 grams

In grams, from

Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs): Recommended Intakes for Individuals, Macronutrients Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine, National Academies


Adult men 56 g/day
Adult women, 46 g/day


From,

Protein requirements of adults, including older people, and women during pregnancy and lactation.(PROTEIN AND AMINO ACID REQUIREMENTS IN HUMAN NUTRITION) COPYRIGHT 2006 World Health Organization


Furthermore, recent detailed balance and body composition studies have shown that with a suitable program of resistance exercise sarcopenia (muscle loss) can be reversed and muscle strength increased on a protein intake of 0.8 g/kg per day (68 ). This intake is similar to the 1985 safe allowance and lower than usual intakes in this population.


(68 ) Campbell WW et al. Dietary protein adequacy and lower body versus whole body resistive training in older humans. Journal of Physiology, 2002, 542:631-642.

So, there you have it. Now realize the .8 gram/kg is based on healthy weight, and includes a fairly liberal safety margin. Nitrogen balance studies have shown adults can maintain nitrogen balance on as little as .5 grams/kg though no one needs to shoot for the minimum. Patients who must limit their protein intake due to kidney issues are usually put on a diet that limits protein intake to around .5-.6 grams/kg and have been shown to actually build strength and muscle at that level.

The simple answer is this, as long as you consume adequate calories to maintain a healthy weight from a variety of whole plant foods, (and not from junk foods and/or just fruit) you will get in all the protein you need.

In Health
Jeff
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Postby Gwen » Thu Jul 17, 2008 11:23 am

Thanks Jeff!
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