sodium exceptions

A place to get your questions answered from McDougall staff dietitian, Jeff Novick, MS, RDN.

Moderators: JeffN, Heather McDougall, carolve

sodium exceptions

Postby KareninTN » Sun Mar 16, 2008 4:32 pm

In the video of your lecture, when you are talking about your guidelines for sodium, on the slide near the bottom, it says "exceptions" and underneath that, "condiments". I can't see below that. Were there any other exceptions other than condiments? What are your guidelines about condiments? (I use a lot of condiments! :lol: )

karenturtle
KareninTN
 
Posts: 510
Joined: Thu Oct 19, 2006 4:51 pm
Location: Oak Ridge, TN

Re: sodium exceptions

Postby JeffN » Sun Mar 16, 2008 5:47 pm

KareninTN wrote:In the video of your lecture, when you are talking about your guidelines for sodium, on the slide near the bottom, it says "exceptions" and underneath that, "condiments". I can't see below that. Were there any other exceptions other than condiments? What are your guidelines about condiments? (I use a lot of condiments! :lol: )

karenturtle


Hi Karen

The exceptions to the sodium guideline listed on the slide were "condiments" and "recipes".

For condiments, the sodium ratio can be over 1:1, even upwards of 4:1 or maybe even 6:1 for 3 reasons.

1) there are few condiments that will make the 1:1 ratio :)

2) hopefully, we are using small amounts of condiments so the contribution of the sodium will be minimal

3) hopefully we adding the condiment to some healthy food, which will help "dilute" out the ratio.

For instance, if you have a salsa and you use 1/2 cup on a medium baked potato. If the 1/2 cup of salsa is 36 calories, and the sodium is 144 mgs that is a 4:1 ratio, which would normally fail. But, the potato is 161 calories and 17 mgs of sodium. So, together, the total calorie of the potato and the salsa is 197 calories and the total sodium is 161, which is below the 1:1 ratio.

In regard to recipes, there is no real "exception" however, the point I was going to make in the talk is that you can use the 1:1 as a guide to how much sodium to add to a recipe. Lets say you make a recipe for a vegetable soup and lets say the total recipe is for around 8 servings and the total calories of the full recipes is around 800 calories. And you analyze the recipe and see that the sodium for the total recipe is 100 mgs. You now know that you can add enough salt to raise the total sodium to 800 mgs so the ratio for the total recipe will be 1:1. In this case, you would be able to add up to 1/3 of a tsp of salt to the recipe.

However, let me caution you to not "push" the limits of these exceptions to far because if you do, you can easily exceed the recommend amounts and the upper limit.

Even if you were to follow the 1:1 on everything you consume, you would exceed the recommended amounts. The guidelines are to help you make healthier choices amongst packaged products which should be a small part of ones intake. The guidelines will only work if you make most of your choices from whole natural foods as they occur in nature.

In Health
Jeff Novick, MS, RD
User avatar
JeffN
 
Posts: 9021
Joined: Tue Jan 08, 2008 5:56 am

More sodium questions...

Postby auntemmy » Thu May 01, 2008 8:55 am

Hi Jeff - I've never been very good at math so I was hoping you could answer this question for me.
If I make vegetable soup with store bought veggie broth that has 530mg sodium per cup and use eight cups of broth in the soup, add no other salt, use salt free canned tomatoes and fresh or frozen veggies, rinse the canned beans etc...would this be considered a high sodium meal? I know I'm going to eat at least two or even three cups of this soup for my meal.

I hope this question isn't too annoying. Thanks!

P.S. Do you have a link or a thread that helps explain how much sodium is too much, etc?
~Emmy

What's taters, precious?
***************************************
Po-ta-toes? Boil 'em. mash 'em, stick 'em in a stew?
User avatar
auntemmy
 
Posts: 584
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2008 11:04 am
Location: Southern California

Postby fiddler3 » Thu May 01, 2008 10:40 am

and KareninTN, which video are you referring to?

fiddler3
User avatar
fiddler3
 
Posts: 500
Joined: Thu Oct 19, 2006 4:17 pm

Re: More sodium questions...

Postby JeffN » Thu May 01, 2008 3:58 pm

Hi Auntemmy,

auntemmy wrote:Hi Jeff - I've never been very good at math so I was hoping you could answer this question for me.


Sure no problem.

auntemmy wrote:If I make vegetable soup with store bought veggie broth that has 530mg sodium per cup and use eight cups of broth in the soup, add no other salt, use salt free canned tomatoes and fresh or frozen veggies, rinse the canned beans etc...would this be considered a high sodium meal? I know I'm going to eat at least two or even three cups of this soup for my meal.


Off hand, yes.

530 mgs per cup x 8 cups of broth = 4240 mgs of sodium. While I don;t know the final figures, this could be 500 mgs of soup per cup and 3 cups a day would be 1500 mgs from just the soup.

But there is only one way to tell for sure.

There are online programs where you can input the recipe and it will tell you the total amounts for everyone. You can use www.fitday.com and do it online or download the CRON-Meter.

In Health
Jeff
User avatar
JeffN
 
Posts: 9021
Joined: Tue Jan 08, 2008 5:56 am

Postby auntemmy » Thu May 01, 2008 6:47 pm

Jeff - thanks for your reply! It appears I will be making my own salt free veggie broth. :cool:

When you did the math, I thought "duh!" I should have been able to figure that one out by myself, but then, that's why I asked you... :-D
~Emmy

What's taters, precious?
***************************************
Po-ta-toes? Boil 'em. mash 'em, stick 'em in a stew?
User avatar
auntemmy
 
Posts: 584
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2008 11:04 am
Location: Southern California


Return to Jeff Novick, RD

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest



Welcome!

Sign up to receive our regular articles, recipes, and news about upcoming events.