Why do refined starches/white flour raise triglyceride?

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Why do refined starches/white flour raise triglyceride?

Postby gracezw » Mon Aug 03, 2020 12:50 pm

I am now studying triglyceride and what causes it to rise.

Here Dr. McD pointed out that refined starches would raise triglyceride. He did not explain why. And I did a quick search and haven't found the reason.

https://www.drmcdougall.com/misc/2010nl/jun/sugar.htm

https://www.drmcdougall.com/misc/2006nl/oct/sugar.htm


I am also learning that fructose contributes to higher triglyceride. My guess is that refined starches contain fructose. Then again why do refined starches/white flour raise triglyceride?
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Re: Why do refined starches/white flour raise triglyceride?

Postby gracezw » Mon Aug 03, 2020 10:06 pm

Thank you!

This is what is relevant from your source:

"Decreasing refined carbohydrate (specifically sugar, bread, and other processed foods made with flour and/or sugar) can also help lower triglycerides. These simple sugars are high in mono- and disaccharides, which raise triglyceride levels. "

This sounds to me to be about a combination of sugar and refined starches. The explanation is just about the simple sugars, and leaves out the refined starches part of it unanswered.


LuckyMomma wrote:https://www.medicinenet.com/how_to_lower_triglycerides_naturally/article.htm
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Re: Why do refined starches/white flour raise triglyceride?

Postby Hal » Thu Aug 06, 2020 4:21 pm

Good question. It's weird because triglycerides are 'fat' are they not?.. or are they something else? and if triglycerides are fat, how do refined starches end up as excess fat in the circulation?

Do refined starches raise triglycerides in those who are WOE compliant? Compliant people generally no longer have insulin tolerance issues, right?, so does this change the equation for refined starch eaters who are compliant? as in, are elevated triglycerides in the system less of a problem? (the way insulin spike is not an issue for WOE) The more we know...

BTW - your new Dr. Mcdougall Youtube channel pages look great! Thanks.
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Re: Why do refined starches/white flour raise triglyceride?

Postby Mom+Me » Fri Aug 07, 2020 10:09 am

I think it is because refined starches are basically seen as sugar by our bodies. I still think eating straight up sugar is way worse than having white rice or white pasta. But in theory since the bran has been removed, it hits our bodies faster because they are refined.

I, too, would like to know more. Unfortunately those who adhere to Dr. McDougall's Plan still can experience raised triglyceride levels, like my elderly McDougalling relative. :? If he has white pasta once ever few months or white rice a few times a month, that is a lot. And his consumption of fruit is only 1-2 servings per day. While his physical activity has been drastically reduced due to disabilities, he still gets in at least 20 (and lately more) minutes of walking everyday. Is the walking at his prior-to-disabilities pace? No. But he at least is moving.

I would love to know the answers, too, as I want his risk for another stroke to be as low as possible!! By the way, he still is on a baby aspirin and 20 mg. of Prevestatin even though his total cholesterol is always under 150 (even before the stroke and being put on the drug).
"Eat your heart out (of trouble)!"--Dr. John A. McDougall
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Re: Why do refined starches/white flour raise triglyceride?

Postby Mom+Me » Fri Aug 07, 2020 11:38 am

I also wonder what differences in triglyceride levels there would be if one consistently consumed steel-cut oats, old-fashioned oatmeal, or quick-cooking oatmeal. I would think it would be obvious that steel-cut would be best, but it still would be interesting--especially between old-fashioned and quick.
"Eat your heart out (of trouble)!"--Dr. John A. McDougall
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