A Day In The Life

A place to get your questions answered from McDougall staff dietitian, Jeff Novick, MS, RDN.

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A Day In The Life

Postby JeffN » Tue Jun 10, 2014 7:05 pm

While I have posted this many times in the past, this issue comes up quite often so I thought I would post on it again.

The issue is how adequate in nutrition is the diet we recommend, especially if you do not "count" anything but just follow the basic guidelines. This issue of "counting" and "measuring" seems to come up often and as you know, I do not recommend that. My recommendation is to follow the principles of Calorie Density and the The Five Pillars of Healthy Eating as outlined here...

https://www.drmcdougall.com/forums/view ... 22&t=37450

So, today, I put together a very simple meal plan based on the above principles, using my SNAP meals,

https://www.drmcdougall.com/forums/view ... 22&t=10519

without focusing on organic foods, super foods, and just using readily available frozen and canned foods too. Just a simple, easy, inexpensive meal plan.

Is the diet adequate in nutrients? Let's see.

Breakfast
1 Cup Cooked Oatmeal
1 Cup Frozen Blueberries
1/2 Banana
1 Tbsp Ground Flax

Lunch
A SNAP Meal (With Beans)
28 oz Diced Tomatoes
1 lb Mixed Frozen Vegetables
4 oz Frozen Collards
2 Cups Whole Wheat Pasta
1 1/2 Cup Canned Kidney Beans (No Salt Added)

Dinner
A SNAP Meal (Without Beans)
28 oz Diced Tomatoes
1 lb Frozen Cauliflower, Broccoli, Carrots
4 oz Frozen Kale
2 Cups Cooked Long Grain Brown Rice

===========================================
Nutrition Summary for June 10, 2014
Report generated by CRON-o-Meter v0.9.9
===========================================

General
===========================================
Energy | 2160.5 kcal - 114%
Protein | 94.8 g - 169%
Fiber | 92.3 g - 308%


Vitamins (100%)
===========================================
Vitamin A | 55246.6 IU - 1842%
Folate | 1072.0 µg - 268%
B1 (Thiamine) | 3.1 mg - 258%
B2 (Riboflavin) | 2.5 mg - 196%
B3 (Niacin) | 30.9 mg - 193%
B5 (Pantothenic Acid)| 8.1 mg - 162%
B6 (Pyridoxine) | 4.6 mg - 273%
Vitamin C | 456.3 mg - 507%
Vitamin E | 18.9 mg - 126%
Vitamin K | 431.6 µg - 360%

Minerals (100%)
===========================================
Calcium | 1285.3 mg - 107%
Copper | 3.8 mg - 426%
Iron | 31.9 mg - 398%
Magnesium | 838.2 mg - 200%
Manganese | 14.5 mg - 632%
Phosphorus | 1978.4 mg - 283%
Potassium | 7651.4 mg - 163%
Selenium | 142.8 µg - 260%
Sodium | 655.1 mg
Zinc | 16.0 mg - 146%


Lipids
===========================================
Saturated | 2.9 g - (1.2% of calories)
Omega-3 | 3.0 g - 188%
Omega-6 | 5.5 g
Omega 6/3 Ratio I 1.88
Cholesterol | 0.0 mg 0%

Some comments.

1) This is a lot of food so you do not have to worry about being hungry or a restrictive eating plan. :)

2) If you prefer, you could eat this in more or less meals per day.

3) While the nutrition is over 100%, remember, we really only have to average about 70% or more of the RDA/DRI's and not beat 100% every day as the RDA/DRI's have built in buffers.

4) In addition, while the above meals plan exceeds all the RDA/DRI's, remember, as we have discussed here in several threads, some of the RDA/DRI's are high (calcium) and we really can get by safely on less.

5) As there are no RDA/DRI's for phyto-chemicals, I can not rate them.

6) In regard to SOS, the above diet is SOS free. However, if someone wanted, they could add about 1/3 tsp salt, which would still keep total sodium under 1500 mg, up to 2 Tbsp of sugar, which would keep sugar under 5% but add 100 calories (50 cal/tbsp).

7) If one wanted, they could also add in another tbsp of flax or chia seeds (37 calories) or 1/2 ounce of walnuts (93 calories) or 1/4 avocado (80 calories), but not all of them, and still have an excellent diet. However, as you can see, it is not necessary.

8 ) As explained in the discussion on my SNAP meals, the above recipes take no more than 10 minutes, have 5 or less ingredients, are based on foods one can get anywhere, involve virtually no prep, clean up or waste and can be done for under $5/day per person.

9) This is only an example and as you can see by how nutrient rich it is, one could easily eat much less food and still have a superior diet. Also, on most diets, one of the major complaints is that there is not enough food to eat and people feel hungry and do not feel satiated. They are also often told to limit the amount of food in regard to the number of meals and/or snacks. Just think, now the problem is, there is so much food to eat. That is a problem we can all live with, and live very well with.

Enough Said. :)

In Health
Jeff
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Re: A Day In The Life

Postby spinner » Wed Jun 11, 2014 2:18 pm

Hi Jeff,
Thanks for a great post. Could you please remind us what SNAP meals are? The ones here look like the ones from Fast Food the Basics, a great video! :-D Thanks!
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Re: A Day In The Life

Postby JeffN » Wed Jun 11, 2014 2:29 pm

spinner wrote:Hi Jeff,
Thanks for a great post. Could you please remind us what SNAP meals are? The ones here look like the ones from Fast Food the Basics, a great video! :-D Thanks!


The DVD was based on the SNAP meals. :)

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Re: A Day In The Life

Postby Concerned » Mon Jun 16, 2014 10:59 am

Is 4 ounces of frozen collards/kale about a half cup? A cup?
A lot of women who succeed in staying slim seem to eat far less than 2000 calories per day, it seems to me. They seem to eat more along the lines of 1400 calories per day. In your experience, does a short woman have to consciously change the proportions of veg/starch/beans (i.e., more veg and less starch/beans) in order to be slim?
Thanks!
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Re: A Day In The Life

Postby JeffN » Mon Jun 16, 2014 11:25 am

Concerned wrote: In your experience, does a short woman have to consciously change the proportions of veg/starch/beans (i.e., more veg and less starch/beans) in order to be slim?Thanks!


First, I do not recommend counting calories.

Second, they would follow the exact same *principles*. This is just an example based on the *principles*.

As I said above..

JeffN wrote:9) This is only an example and as you can see by how nutrient rich it is, one could easily eat much less food and still have a superior diet. Also, on most diets, one of the major complaints is that there is not enough food to eat and people feel hungry and do not feel satiated. They are also often told to limit the amount of food in regard to the number of meals and/or snacks. Just think, now the problem is, there is so much food to eat. That is a problem we can all live with, and live very well with.


Lastly, I know very few women, even short ones :), who are meeting the minimum requirements for activity (which they should be), who need 1400 calories or less. That is based on inaccurate information and inaccurate calorie counts.

If you look here, a 50 year old women who is 5' and weighs 100 lbs, which is lower end of BMI range, needs 1650-1900 calories (give or take a few), depending on their activity level.

http://www.mayoclinic.org/calorie-calcu ... t-20084939

Follow the *principles* and do not count calories and it works every time. :)

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Re: A Day In The Life

Postby JeffN » Wed Jun 18, 2014 8:33 am

I have received several emails and messages about whether or not this would be adequate at a lower calorie value.

So, I redid the analysis adjusting according to the principles.

Here it is at 1500 calories using the same principles as above, just adjusting accordingly. As I recommend, I shifted the "plate" slightly to be lower in calorie density so, though the calories were reduced, the volume and weight of food still remained high.

While there are lots of numbers here, remember, this is about the principles and guidelines and no numbers are need.

Breakfast
.5 Cup Cooked Oatmeal
.75 Cup Frozen Blueberries
1/2 Banana
1 Tbsp Ground Flax

Lunch
A SNAP Meal (With Beans)
28 oz Diced Tomatoes
.75 lb Mixed Frozen Vegetables
4 oz Frozen Collards
1 Cups Whole Wheat Pasta
1 1/8 Cup Canned Kidney Beans (No Salt Added)

Dinner
A SNAP Meal (Without Beans)
28 oz Diced Tomatoes
.75 lb Frozen Cauliflower, Broccoli, Carrots
4 oz Frozen Kale
1 Cups Cooked Long Grain Brown Rice


===========================================
Nutrition Summary for June 18, 2014
Report generated by CRON-o-Meter v0.9.9
===========================================

General
===========================================
Energy | 1522.2 kcal
Protein | 69.5 g 124%
Fiber | 72.2 g 241%

Vitamins (100%)
===========================================
Vitamin A | 49731.8 IU - 1658%
Folate | 875.7 µg - 219%
B1 (Thiamine) | 2.4 mg - 200%
B2 (Riboflavin) | 2.2 mg - 168%
B3 (Niacin) | 24.8 mg - 155%
B5 (Pantothenic Acid)| 6.0 mg - 120%
B6 (Pyridoxine) | 3.9 mg - 230%
Vitamin C | 408.1 mg - 453%
Vitamin E | 17.0 mg - 113%
Vitamin K | 350.8 µg - 292%

Minerals (100%)
===========================================
Calcium | 1182.9 mg - 99%
Copper | 3.0 mg - 333%
Iron | 25.6 mg - 320%
Magnesium | 624.8 mg - 149%
Manganese | 9.5 mg - 413%
Phosphorus | 1422.5 mg - 203%
Potassium | 6727.6 mg - 143%
Selenium | 78.4 µg - 142%
Sodium | 549.1 mg - 270%
Zinc | 11.2 mg - 102%

Lipids (34%)
===========================================
Saturated | 2.0 g
Omega-3 | 2.7 g 169%
Omega-6 | 3.7 g
Omega 6/3 l 1.37
Cholesterol | 0.0 mg

As I said above, "follow the *principles* and do not count calories and it works every time."

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