juicing and cleansing

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juicing and cleansing

Postby Raytaupedi » Tue Nov 29, 2011 8:45 am

Is there any evidence that juicing or colon cleansing is of any benefit.

Seems to me that juicing removes all the good fiber increasing the sugar load to the bloodstream
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Re: juicing and cleansing

Postby JeffN » Tue Nov 29, 2011 8:57 am

Correct

Eat your food, don't drink it.

The Human body is a self-cleansing mechanism. This is the main purpose of the liver, kidney, lungs, skin, bowels, etc. The human body is always detoxifying and cleansing itself. There are no true cleansing diets or products as most are just laxatives and fiber. There is no build up of toxic waste or fecal matter on the inside of the colon. The lining of the colon wall is similar to the tissue on the inside of the mouth. It is moist and always sloughing off its old outer tissue layers.

Also, this article, "The Dangers of Colon Cleansing," came out recently in the Journal of Family Practice.

http://www.jfponline.com/pages.asp?id=9783

Some highlights

- Despite colon cleansing’s long history and current popularity, the literature does not support its purported benefits.

- Some herbal preparations have also been associated with aplastic anemia and liver toxicity.

- During the past decade, the FDA has issued many warning letters to manufacturers for unapproved use of the devices for colon cleansing.

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Re: juicing and cleansing

Postby abc_1235 » Tue Nov 29, 2011 4:43 pm

Jeff, can you explain to me the success people seem to have on these juicing feasts who otherwise do not have success in other diets? Is this an effective way to regain health before maintaining on this type of diet?
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Re: juicing and cleansing

Postby JeffN » Tue Nov 29, 2011 5:01 pm

Describe "success."

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Re: juicing and cleansing

Postby abc_1235 » Tue Nov 29, 2011 5:18 pm

Success: Getting off of all their medications, blood levels returning to healthy levels, dramatic weight loss of around a pound a day without any hunger, increased energy, better overall health and mood. Basically reversal of disease and regain of health, appearance and energy. I see no other diet that people regain their health and lose weight as quickly as this and without hunger or struggle.

There are movies, youtube videos, etc. on this. One guy just lost 200 pounds in a year on raw foods and juicing/fasting.
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Re: juicing and cleansing

Postby JeffN » Tue Nov 29, 2011 5:22 pm

Our standard in this forum is published peer reviewed credible evidence as described in the "burden of proof" discussions

Otherwise we might as well let any anecdotal evidence in too.

:)

Do you have any?

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Re: juicing and cleansing

Postby JeffN » Wed Nov 30, 2011 4:41 am

Don't be fooled by parlor tricks. When someone goes on a cleansing/juice program

- they usually/always greatly eliminate or stop the ingestion of harmful foods and substances

- the usually/always consume nothing but fruit and/or veggie juices and or fruit and veggies

- they usually/always greatly reduce their caloric intake

- if they are taking any product along with the cleanse, it is almost always nothing more than a fiber/laxative product.

Cleansing and juicing diets do not heal as they have no intrinsic power to do so. The body heals and is always striving to do its best. By taking the steps above, they allow the body the opportunity to heal.

The exact same results happen when they go on a healthy diet or a total medically supervised fast so how could the juice be responsible for anything?

Again, if you have not seen his DVD, check out Dr Klapers talk on Digestion where he goes into detail and explains all of this

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Re: juicing and cleansing

Postby Karen McK » Wed Nov 30, 2011 6:10 am

Jeff,
Where do we find this DVD by Dr. Michael Klaper?
Thanks a bunch!
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Re: juicing and cleansing

Postby JeffN » Wed Nov 30, 2011 6:29 am

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Re: juicing and cleansing

Postby Karen McK » Wed Nov 30, 2011 7:06 am

Thanks Jeff! Ordered it! I have a very high respect for Dr. Klaper. He is the real deal...as are you!

Have a wonder~filled day!
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Juicing, Cleansing and You: Detox or Detour?

Postby JeffN » Tue May 19, 2015 12:32 pm

Jeff, can you explain to me the success people seem to have on these juicing feasts who otherwise do not have success in other diets?


Yes, we all have heard these success stories related to juicing. So, lets put that in proper perspective.


1) The fact that people may use juicing and get better does not in anyway make juicing healthy. People get better on many diets and programs, short-term. If you head on over to the Paleo crowd, or the Atkins crowd, or the Zone crowd, or the MED diet crowd, etc etc, you will hear the same proclamations. Yet, I would not recommend any of these programs. I have even showed you a well done, published, peer-reviewed study where one of the diets was 47% white sugar, yet the DB subjects, lost weight, lowered their cholesterol, LDL, blood sugars and insulin all very quickly but I would not recommend that either.

viewtopic.php?f=1&t=6854&p=48020&h#p48020

There is more to this than just some short-term "results" but also putting it all into proper perspective and understanding the how and why about what is happening. Juicing is a highly processed food, even if you make it at home. Of course, juice is much better than the SAD and anyone who moves from the SAD to a healthier diet, especially if it is a whole foods plant based diet, which includes juices will do better. However, there is a reason why not one of the clinical programs that have published evidence over the last 60 years on a lower fat, minimally processed, lo/no SOS diet diet used liquid calories, juices or smoothies as a main part of the program. And, if any did use any, it was nothing more than an occasional condiment or flavoring or occasional treat or in rare and limited special instances (i.e. prune juice for constipation)

To make the point, you would now have to show that the same lower fat, minimally processed, lo/no SOS diet with juices is superior to the same lower fat, minimally processed, lo/no SOS diet without juices. Never been done, nor will it. On the other hand, we have over 60 years of clinical experience where for many people, we have to remove juices to get them to fully recover. The only exception to this is with the therapeutic initiation phase of the rice diet, where he was working with extremely ill people, on a very low calorie diet with extremely limited food and calorie options and was just trying to get a few extra calories in them.


2) Speak to a few Speech Language Pathology therapists or Registered Nurses experienced in long term residential care about what they think of an adult with no dental or swallowing problems choosing to volunteering juice/liquefy/purée a significant portion of their calories everyday and the potential impact of the long term dental & overall health. In these settings, they do everything they can to avoid putting the residents on juiced, blended and liquid foods as long as they can and actively work with them to be able to keep the residents chewing their food as long as possible. This is because chewing ability has been found to be associated with heart health and longevity. Here is the direct link to an earlier post on the topic with the studies and the references

viewtopic.php?f=22&t=5822&p=39626&#p39626


3) Fruit juice is now seen as an added/free sugar and is counted in the recommendations to limit added/free sugars. A glass of fruit juice can have as many, if not more, added/free sugars as a glass of any other sugar sweetened beverages, like soda.

Fruit Juice: Just Another Sugar?
http://www.drmcdougall.com/forums/viewt ... 22&t=41620

The WHO New Recommendations for Added Sugar Intake
viewtopic.php?f=22&t=41862

Is Fruit Juice Healthy?
http://youtu.be/HCEM0SrJudQ


4) You can do a simple experiment, measure the exact amount of food out you are now consuming for your blended breakfast, measure the exact amount of calories in it, eat it, and in one hour measure your blood sugar & insulin and again at 90, 120, 180, and 240 minutes.Then the next day, measure out the exact same amount of food, see how much of it you can eat unblended and measure out the calories in what you can eat unblended to see the difference, and then again, measure blood sugar and insulin at 1 hour and at 90, 120, 180, and 240 minutes. Once you see these numbers and the different impact on calories, blood sugar & insulin, (not counting the potential impact on TG's) you will understand.

You can see what happened when similar experiments were done on whole fruit, blended fruit and juiced fruit.

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set ... 124&type=3

viewtopic.php?f=22&t=15419


5) Feeding studies, in which people are actually administered fruit juice, clearly show that it raises serum uric acid,(1,2,4) and epidemiological studies also overwhelmingly show that higher fruit juice consumption increases the risk of gout.(3,5,6)

1: Vieira FG, Di Pietro PF, da Silva EL, Borges GS, Nunes EC, Fett R. Improvement of serum antioxidant status in humans after the acute intake of apple juices. Nutr Res. 2012 Mar;32(3):229-32. Epub 2012 Feb 7. PubMed PMID: 22464810.

2: Gonçalves MC, Bezerra FF, Eleutherio EC, Bouskela E, Koury J. Organic grape juice intake improves functional capillary density and postocclusive reactive hyperemia in triathletes. Clinics (Sao Paulo). 2011;66(9):1537-41. PubMed PMID: 22179155; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3164400.

3: Choi HK, Willett W, Curhan G. Fructose-rich beverages and risk of gout in women. JAMA. 2010 Nov 24;304(20):2270-8. Epub 2010 Nov 10. PubMed PMID: 21068145; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3058904.

4: Godycki-Cwirko M, Krol M, Krol B, Zwolinska A, Kolodziejczyk K, Kasielski M, Padula G, Grebowski J, Kazmierska P, Miatkowski M, Markowski J, Nowak D. Uric acid but not apple polyphenols is responsible for the rise of plasma antioxidant activity after apple juice consumption in healthy subjects. J Am Coll Nutr. 2010 Aug;29(4):397-406. Erratum in: J Am Coll Nutr. 2010 Dec;29(6):iii. Grębocki, Jacek [corrected to Grebowski, Jacek]; Kazimierska, Paulina [corrected to Kazmierska, Paulina]. PubMed PMID: 21041815.

5: Chang WC. Dietary intake and the risk of hyperuricemia, gout and chronic kidney disease in elderly Taiwanese men. Aging Male. 2011 Sep;14(3):195-202. Epub 2010 Sep 20. PubMed PMID: 20849370.

6: Choi HK, Curhan G. Soft drinks, fructose consumption, and the risk of gout in men: prospective cohort study. BMJ. 2008 Feb 9;336(7639):309-12. Epub 2008 Jan 31. PubMed PMID: 18244959; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2234536.

Hypothesis:could excessive fructose intake and uric acid cause type 2 diabetes? Endocr Rev.
2009 Feb;30(1):96-116. Epub 2009 Jan 16. Review. PubMed PMID: 19151107; PMC2647706.
http://edrv.endojournals.org/content/30/1/96.full


6) Fat Burning/Oxidation -

Though some people may think drinking fruit juice in moderation is okay, the study below shows that drinking it has an immediate effect on one’s metabolism. The feeling of hunger following both meals was the same even though the breakfast with orange juice contained more calories and a lot more carbohydrates. These extra calories did not signal the body to eat less following the meal. Sugary foods often do little to curb appetite, so people may eat a lot more without feeling like they’ve done so. HDL cholesterol was lower after the breakfast that included the orange juice. Also, plasma free fatty acids (fatty acids used for fuel) were reduced, and triglycerides and VLDL (small, dense) cholesterol were much higher after the breakfast with orange juice. Fat utilization after the breakfast with orange juice was reduced by about 30%. So following the breakfast with the orange juice, study participants saw a reduction in fat burning (or increased reliance on sugar for energy), lowered HDL cholesterol, and increased triglycerides and VLDL cholesterol.

Orange juice limits postprandial fat oxidation after breakfast in normal-weight adolescents and adults.
Stookey JD, Hamer J, Espinoza G, Higa A, Ng V, Tinajero-Deck L, Havel PJ, King JC.
Adv Nutr. 2012 Jul 1;3(4):629S-35S. doi: 10.3945/an.112.001990.
PMID:22798004

Abstract
Caloric beverages may promote weight gain by simultaneously increasing total energy intake and limiting fat oxidation. During moderate intensity exercise, caloric beverage intake depresses fat oxidation by 25% or more. This randomized crossover study describes the impact of having a caloric beverage with a typical meal on fat oxidation under resting conditions. On 2 separate days, healthy normal-weight adolescents (n = 7) and adults (n = 10) consumed the same breakfast with either orange juice or drinking water and sat at rest for 3 h after breakfast. The meal paired with orange juice was 882 kJ (210 kcal) higher than the meal paired with drinking water. Both meals contained the same amount of fat (12 g). For both age groups, both meals resulted in a net positive energy balance 150 min after breakfast. Resting fat oxidation 150 min after breakfast was significantly lower after breakfast with orange juice, however. The results suggest that, independent of a state of energy excess, when individuals have a caloric beverage instead of drinking water with a meal, they are less likely to oxidize the amount of fat consumed in the meal before their next meal.


7) Cancer/ Colon Cancer

Juice was found to increase colon cancer risk whereas whole fruits and vegetables were associated with a decreased risk of these cancers

Fruit and Vegetable Consumption and the Risk of Proximal Colon, Distal Colon, and Rectal Cancers in a Case-Control Study in Western Australia J Am Diet Assoc. 2011;111:1479-1490.

ABSTRACT
Background
Fruits and vegetables (F/V) have been exam- ined extensively in nutrition research in relation to colo- rectal cancer (CRC). However, their protective effect is subject to debate, possibly because of different effects on different subsites of the large bowel.
Objective
To determine whether any association between F/V consumption and risk of CRC differed by subsite of the bowel (proximal colon, distal colon, and rectum).
Design
The Western Australian Bowel Health Study is a population-based, case-control study conducted between June 2005 and August 2007. Complete food frequency questionnaire data were analysed from 834 CRC cases and 939 controls. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the effects of quartiles of F/V intake on risk of CRC at different subsites. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for CRC overall and for the three separate subsites.
Results
Risk of proximal colon cancer and rectal cancer was not associated with intakes of total F/V, total vege- table, or total fruit. Brassica vegetable intake was in- versely related with proximal colon cancer (Q4 vs Q1 OR 0.62; 95% CI 0.41 to 0.93). For distal colon cancer, signif- icant negative trends were seen for total F/V, and total vegetable intake. Distal colon cancer risk was signifi- cantly decreased for intake of dark yellow vegetables (Q4 vs Q1 OR 0.61; 95% CI 0.41 to 0.92) and apples (Q4 vs Q1 OR 0.51; 95% CI 0.34 to 0.77). An increased risk for CRC was found to be associated with intake of fruit juice (Q4 vs Q1 OR 1.74; 95% CI 1.24 to 2.45).
Conclusions Our results suggest that different F/V may confer different risks for cancer of the proximal colon, distal colon, or rectum. Future studies might consider taking into account the location of the tumor when exam- ining the relation between F/V consumption and risk of CRC.


By consuming whole foods instead of just their juices you have access to additional health benefits such as cancer fighting properties that you throw out when you just drink the juice

Anti-cancer properties of phenolics from apple waste on colon carcinogenesis in vitro
Food and Chemical Toxicology 45 (2007) 1224–1230
http://www.researchgate.net/publication ... s_in_vitro

Abstract
Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in Western countries. The World Health Organisation identifies diet as a critical risk factor in the development and progression of this disease and the protective role of high levels of fruit and vegetable consumption. Several studies have shown that apples contain several phenolic compounds that are potent anti-oxidants in humans. However, little is known about other beneficial properties of apple phenolics in cancer. We have used the HT29, HT115 and CaCo-2 cell lines as in vitro models to examine the effect of apple phenolics (0.01–0.1% apple extract) on key stages of colorectal carcinogenesis, namely; DNA dam- age (Comet assay), colonic barrier function (TER assay), cell cycle progression (DNA content assay) and invasion (Matrigel assay). Our results indicate that a crude extract of apple phenolics can protect against DNA damage, improve barrier function and inhibit invasion (p < 0.05). The anti-invasive effects of the extract were enhanced with twenty-four hour pretreatment of cells (p < 0.05). We have shown that a crude apple extract from waste, rich in phenolic compounds, beneficially influences key stages of carcinogenesis in colon cells in vitro.


8 ) Fiber plays an important role in our diet & health including:

- Providing bulk in stools which helps to maintain bowel regularity and avoiding the straining that may cause problems such as hemorrhoids, varicose veins, and prolapsed uterus;

- Satisfying our hunger drive

- Stabilizing blood sugars

- Reducing elevated lipid levels

- Stimulates intestinal fermentation production of short-chain fatty acids, which may reduce risk of colorectal cancer.

- Binding and eliminating excess hormones, cancer-causing toxins, cholesterol, etc in the stool, which helps with the body's natural cleansing & detoxifying process.

I have compiled a long list of studies highlighting the many benefits of fiber in this thread...

viewtopic.php?f=22&t=47765&p=492374&#p462520

Currently, about 97% of Americans fall short of the recommended intake of fiber, with the average intake being about 1/2 the RDA. I would consider that a serious and important health issue.

Juice has no fiber.



9) We also limit the amount of fruit juice recommended to children.

The American Academy of Pediatrics Recommendations on Juice provide the following specific recommendations (Pediatrics. 2001 May;107(5):1210-3.)

Fruit Juice and Your Child's Diet - AAP Daily Juice Recommendations. Adapted from Healthy Children, Fit Children: Answers to Common Questions From Parents About Nutrition and Fitness (Copyright 2011 American Academy of Pediatrics). Last Updated 5/5/2015

- Assuming no other health issues, intake of fruit juice should be limited to 4 to 6 oz/d for children 1 to 6 years old. Do not allow your child to carry a cup or box of juice throughout the day.

- For children 7 to 18 years old, juice intake should be limited to 8 to 12 oz or 2 servings per day.

- For those younger than 6 months, do not give fruit juice to infants younger than 6 months since it offers no nutritional benefit at this age.

They note:

- Fruit juice offers no nutritional benefits over whole fruit

- Whole fruits also provide fiber and other nutrients.

- Excessive juice consumption may be associated with malnutrition, diarrhea, flatulence, abdominal distention, and tooth decay


If someone wanted to use some juice or liquid calories, the best way to use them is in small amounts to enhance the consumption of healthy, very low &/or low calorie dense foods. For example, in people wanting to lose weight, adding a little fruit juice to a dressing/sauce that would encourage the consumption of more salad and vegetables, might be beneficial in helping them achieve their health goals. In addition, for people wanting to gain weight, adding a little fruit juice to a dressing/sauce that would encourage the consumption of more whole grains, beans, tubers, etc. might be beneficial in helping them achieve their health goals. The main point is to understand how these foods may be used in a positive way to enhance the consumption of healthy foods, while still keeping the amount of added free sugars to a minimum without raising the overall calorie density too high.

If you are healthy & if you want, enjoy them (liquid calories) on occasion but they should not be a regular part of your diet. We are much better off chewing our food and in consuming our food with as minimal processing as possible

Remember, we are in this for the long haul, not just for some short term results and/or for just a few months or a year.

In Health
Jeff

UPDATE: A few more..

A few more on juices

Fruit Consumption and Adiposity Status in Adults: A Systematic Review of Current Evidence.
Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2015 Jun 26:0

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26115001

The aim of this review was to update current understanding of the potential association between fruit consumption and adiposity status in adult populations. Electronic databases were searched from 01/01/1997 to the search date of 15/08/2014, retrieving 4, 382 abstracts that were reviewed for eligibility: randomised controlled trial (RCT) or prospective cohort (PC), published in English, assessing the effect of whole fruit or fruit juice consumption on adiposity in healthy adult populations. Quality ratings for the 11 included RCTs were either positive (n=2), neutral (n=8) or negative (n=1), while the six included PCs were either positive (n=4) or neutral (n=2). Consumption of whole fruit was found to contribute to a reduced risk for long-term weight gain in middle-aged adults. Experimental trials suggest this beneficial effect of whole fruit is mediated by a reduction in total energy intake. Fruit juice however, had an opposing effect, promoting weight gain over the long term. This review reinforces national food based dietary guidelines encouraging the consumption of whole fruits and replacing fruit juices with plain water, as part of a broader set of dietary strategies to reduce total dietary energy intake in adult populations.


Longitudinal evaluation of 100% fruit juice consumption on BMI status in 2-5-year-old children.
Pediatr Obes. 2015 Jun 25. doi: 10.1111/ijpo.12048.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26110996

METHODS: We used linear and logistic multivariable regression to evaluate body mass index (BMI) z-score and overweight/obese status as a function of 100% fruit juice intake for 8950 children examined at ages 2, 4 and 5 years as part of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort, a representative sample of the United States.

RESULTS: Cross-sectional analysis at ages 4 and 5 years showed no difference in the prevalence of overweight and obesity between consistent juice drinkers and inconsistent/non-drinkers. Longitudinal analysis found that children who drank 100% juice consistently at age 2 years had greater increases in BMI z-score by age 4 years than infrequent/non-drinkers (P < 0.0001), a difference driven by lesser increases in height z-score (P = 0.0003) and slightly greater increases in weight z-score (P = 0.0550) among consistent juice drinkers over the 2 to 4 year time period. Additionally, consistent juice drinkers at age 2 had higher odds of becoming overweight by age 4 (adjusted odds ratio 1.30; CI 1.06-1.60). These differences in growth parameters were not noted between ages 4 and 5 years.

CONCLUSIONS: Drinking 100% fruit juice regularly at age 2 is associated with higher odds of becoming overweight between 2 and 4 years. Paediatricians and parents can discourage excessive fruit juice consumption as part of a larger effort to avoid unhealthy gain in BMI in young children.
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Re: juicing and cleansing

Postby JeffN » Sun Jul 19, 2015 6:26 am

Another international health organization recommends limiting "free" sugars to no more than 5% of calories and included fruit juice as an "free" sugar.

In Health
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Independent report
SACN Carbohydrates and Health Report

The Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition recommendations on carbohydrates, including sugars and fibre
Public Health England
17 July 2015

https://www.gov.uk/government/publicati ... lth-report

Highlights

- Free sugars should account for no more than 5% daily dietary energy intake.

- Free sugars are those added to food or those naturally present in honey, syrups and unsweetened fruit juices

- The consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (e.g. fizzy drinks, soft drinks and squash) should be minimised by both children and adults.

- High levels of sugar consumption are associated with a greater risk of tooth decay.

- The higher the proportion of sugar in the diet, the greater the risk of high energy intake.

- Drinking high-sugar beverages results in weight gain and increases in BMI in teenagers and children.

- Consuming too many high-sugar beverages increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Press Release
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/s ... y_2015.PDF

Full Report
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/s ... Health.pdf
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Re: juicing and cleansing

Postby JeffN » Mon Jan 30, 2017 2:27 pm

The impact of water intake on energy intake and weight status: a systematic review
Nutr Rev. 2010 Sep; 68(9): 505–521.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2929932/

Abstract
The effects of consuming water with meals rather than drinking no beverage or various other beverages remains under-studied. This systematic review of English language studies compared the effects of drinking water and various beverage alternatives on energy intake and/or weight status. We collected relevant clinical trials, epidemiologic, and intervention studies and summarized findings across the literature. Using clinical trials, average differences in total energy intake at test meals (ΔTEI) were calculated across studies for each of several beverage categories compared to water. The literature for these comparisons is sparse and somewhat inconclusive. One of the most consistent sets of findings comes from comparing adults drinking sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB’s) vs. water before a single meal. Total energy intakes were increased 7.8% (ΔTEI range −7.5 to 18.9) when SSBs were consumed. Studies comparing nonnutritive sweeteners with water were also relatively consistent and found no impact on energy intake among adults (ΔTEI = −1.3, range −9 to13.8). Much less conclusive evidence replacing water with milk and juice estimated increases in TEI of 14.9% (range 10.9 to 23.9). These findings, along with epidemiologic and intervention studies suggested a potentially important role for water in reducing energy intakes, and by this means a role in obesity prevention. A need for randomized-controlled trials exists.


Conclusion
This review clarifies what is known about the effects of drinking water on energy intake and weight status, as well as highlighting critical literature gaps. The review does not support that removing drinking water from a meal significantly changes TEI, although a small increase in TEI was seen in older adults. In contrast, for adults, the review finds reasonable agreement among a number of single meal studies that replacing water with sugar-sweetened beverages will increase energy intake (7.8% ΔTEIwa, range −7.5 to 18.9). There were far fewer studies replacing water with juice and milk but the weighted average showed a sizeable increase in total energy intake (15% ΔTEIwa, range 10.9–19.7). The literature on comparison of water with artificially sweetened beverages found a negligible statistically insignificant reduction in energy intake (−1.4% ΔTEIwa, range −9.0 to 13.8%).
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Re: Juicing, Cleansing and You: Detox or Detour?

Postby JeffN » Mon May 22, 2017 9:07 am

JeffN wrote:
9) We also limit the amount of fruit juice recommended to children.

The American Academy of Pediatrics Recommendations on Juice provide the following specific recommendations (Pediatrics. 2001 May;107(5):1210-3.)

Fruit Juice and Your Child's Diet - AAP Daily Juice Recommendations. Adapted from Healthy Children, Fit Children: Answers to Common Questions From Parents About Nutrition and Fitness (Copyright 2011 American Academy of Pediatrics). Last Updated 5/5/2015

- Assuming no other health issues, intake of fruit juice should be limited to 4 to 6 oz/d for children 1 to 6 years old. Do not allow your child to carry a cup or box of juice throughout the day.

- For children 7 to 18 years old, juice intake should be limited to 8 to 12 oz or 2 servings per day.

- For those younger than 6 months, do not give fruit juice to infants younger than 6 months since it offers no nutritional benefit at this age.

They note:

- Fruit juice offers no nutritional benefits over whole fruit

- Whole fruits also provide fiber and other nutrients.

- Excessive juice consumption may be associated with malnutrition, diarrhea, flatulence, abdominal distention, and tooth decay



This has just been update and they have tightened their guidelines

Pediatrics
May 2017
From the American Academy of Pediatrics
Policy Statement
Fruit Juice in Infants, Children, and Adolescents: Current Recommendations

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/c ... .2017-0967


Recommendations (there are 12 recommendations, I found these 2 the most relevant)

1. Juice should not be introduced into the diet of infants before 12 months of age unless clinically indicated. The intake of juice should be limited to, at most, 4 ounces/day in toddlers 1 through 3 years of age, and 4 to 6 ounces/day for children 4 through 6 years of age. For children 7 to 18 years of age, juice intake should be limited to 8 ounces or 1 cup of the recommended 2 to 2.5 cups of fruit servings per day.

3. Children should be encouraged to eat whole fruit to meet their recommended daily fruit intake and should be educated regarding the benefit of fiber intake and the longer time to consume the same kilocalories when consuming whole fruit compared with fruit juice.


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