The "Religion" of Veganism

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Rod

Postby f1jim » Wed Apr 01, 2009 5:43 pm

I think most people here that have tried to approach others having health issues have run into that same "meat or else" mentality. It's strange that some particular food has such an addictive grip on people that sickness and death scare them less! Even when I was a Star SADer I never had such a complex about it. Remember, you can lead a horse to water......
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Postby MilesA » Fri May 29, 2009 4:34 pm

I was exposed a long time ago to a strict vegetarian diet by friends who were Seventh Day Adventists. I admired their health more than their religion, but always felt good after eating food they had made.

This style of eating did not seem strange to me at all because they set a good example. They were also happy to educate if someone was interested.
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Re: The "Religion" of Veganism

Postby nonyabizz » Mon Aug 17, 2009 1:12 pm

Becky wrote:Dr. McDougall writes:

Being vegan says to me this is a person with outstanding character. Vegans are self-sacrificing and committed to making a difference. When everyone else is certain that it is our God-given right to mistreat and kill cows, pigs, chickens, and fishes in order to be properly nourished; a vegan would rather risk protein and calcium deficiency than to harm these beautiful creatures. Of course, this deep sacrifice ends with the discovery that plants provide all needed proteins, amino acids, essential fats, vitamins, and minerals (including calcium) without the inherent risks of flesh and dairy. Vegans are self-confident. They remain steadfast even when mom, dad, dietitian, and doctor are visibly angered by their religion of “veganism.” Vegans are industrious. To avoid eating animals in a world where beef, chicken, and cheese are mixed in with everything in the market and on the menu is a daily struggle. Reading labels, turning down invitations to dinner, and occasionally, going hungry, require more effort than the average person is willing to muster.



I just tell them I'm intending to reverse my heart disease.
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Postby Becky » Mon Aug 17, 2009 1:59 pm

Yeah, I know what you mean. Lately my husband and I just say we are on a cholesterol free diet. Period.
See how I am McDougallizing the recipes in
Robin Roberston's "1000 Vegan Recipes" -
http://testing-1000vr.blogspot.com
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Postby DrFood » Sun Sep 06, 2009 5:00 pm

As someone who is very involved with the vegan community and who follows a vegan diet and lifestyle for ethical reasons (e.g. no leather, no silk, no products containing animal products or tested on animals), we generally refer to those who abstain from eating animals and animal products for health not ethics as individuals who eat a "plant-based" diet but they are not referred to by us as "vegans". Months back Mark Bittman, cookbook author and NY Times food columnist, wrote an article in which he claimed to be "Vegan until Dinner". In my view this is a misuse of the term "vegan", which means a total lifestyle choice devoted to animal welfare. This is not to say that I and other vegans don't greatly appreciate every single human being that gives up eating animals and animal products because we appreciate the many animal lives that are saved by such choices, but the term vegan still does not apply.
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Postby LunchBox » Wed Oct 07, 2009 9:47 pm

I can relate to the "peer pressure" to serve and eat meat. I'm rather new to McDougalling, so my backbone isn't very firm.

My first step was as a dinner guest I cut up the meat an pushed it around the plate. I picked through the salad and shook off the cheese. Not very bold, I'm afraid.

Next step: I went to a dinner served buffet style and just took the fresh fruit and a roll and nothing else. "What, no butter?" Gotta a few strange looks and only the one comment.

For me, a milestone this week: I finally served guests a vegan meal without apologizing or explaining. They enjoyed it! If they noticed there was no meat, they didn't say a word. I'm feeling brave now!

But, it is still crazy out there with so many people willing to comment on how other adults feed themselves!
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Postby CarolynA » Sun Nov 29, 2009 6:41 pm

I have been trying to move toward a vegan diet for quite some time, only to have declining health issues because of my failure to do so. My husband is very supportive, but my parents and siblings are not. Lately, this has become a big issue. My youngest brother (11 years older than me) was diagnosed with colon cancer this year, my older brother has a heart condition and sleep apnea, my oldest sister has high blood pressure, and my other sister has fibromyalgia. So far, my blood sugar has been slightly high, although not outside the "normal" range. I really want to be completely vegan, because I know that my health depends upon it.

My parents and siblings do not want to hear anything about the McDougall program, and refuse to consider my dietary needs when planning family dinners. Last week I had an argument with my Mother about it, and so I elected not to go to the family Thanksgiving dinner. I really feel that if they cannot be supportive, then they are poison to my well-being, and I will need to avoid them until I am completely vegan and strong enough to just avoid the foods that they prepare completely.

Veganism is not a religion to me, but a life-saving opportunity. I have ready multiple books on the subject, and I am convinced that this is the best lifestyle for avoiding the diseases that plague our country. I appreciated the quote from McDougall - he is right. It takes a lot of courage and conviction to be vegan, but we will be rewarded with good health for the rest of our lives.

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Pleasure Trap DVD

Postby Steve » Mon Nov 30, 2009 6:30 am

Hi Carolyn,

Sorry you are running into such protracted resistance from family members. You may already have the Pleasure Trap DVD. If not, I believe it the best source of advice for handling friends, family and coworkers is the three part Pleasure Trap DVD by Dough Lisle. Dough explains that there are two types of folks we run into. Those who have no idea what we are doing and those who know perfectly well what we are doing (such as your close relatives). He provides different strategies for dealing with both. The DVD gives deep insight into why we prefer food that we know is unhealthy and give strategies for overcoming these natural tendencies and explains so much more.

As I posted several times before, I only wish I had this information when I first started over 15 years ago. I could of saved myself and everyone else a lot of problems.

http://drmcdougall.com/store_pleasuretrap.html

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Postby CarolynA » Mon Nov 30, 2009 3:24 pm

Just a small update - I spoke with my sister this morning, and found out that she has been reading books about the health benefits of a vegetarian diet. She has decided that she wants to try it, to see if it will help with her fibromyalgia. So, she said that if I will come to Christmas, she will make a vegan recipe, and then if I make a vegan recipe, at least there will be 2 things we can eat, and we can be a support system for each other. I am so excited that she is at least willing to give it a try!

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Postby Love the Lorax » Tue Dec 01, 2009 9:01 am

How wonderful! Even a little bit of support can make a big difference.

CarolynA wrote:Just a small update - I spoke with my sister this morning, and found out that she has been reading books about the health benefits of a vegetarian diet. She has decided that she wants to try it, to see if it will help with her fibromyalgia. So, she said that if I will come to Christmas, she will make a vegan recipe, and then if I make a vegan recipe, at least there will be 2 things we can eat, and we can be a support system for each other. I am so excited that she is at least willing to give it a try!

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Re: The "Religion" of Veganism

Postby rkeinc » Sun Dec 01, 2013 4:19 pm

Becky, I agree with your "concept" of "veganism" BUT take exception to comparing "veganism" to a "religion". I could write a book about "religions" and there are over 1500 in America alone. "Veganism" is a lifestyle choice that involves what you eat. It is not a "religion", i.e. "the belief in and worship of a superhuman controlling power, esp. a personal God or gods." By calling "veganism" a religion, you are "alienating" everyone who believes in their "religion" to consider "veganism" as a lifestyle for what they should choose to eat. I don't think that is your goal. :crybaby:
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Re: The "Religion" of Veganism

Postby Joseph65 » Sun Dec 01, 2013 8:51 pm

I don't mind when someone from the general population questions my eating what really enflames me Is when I get grief from other vegans about my no oils way of eating. Their attitude is I'm taking the whole concept of healthy eating way out of bounds. My comments back are that we'll see who ends up in the hospital first.
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Re: The "Religion" of Veganism

Postby Becky » Mon Dec 02, 2013 11:40 am

rkeinc wrote:Becky, I agree with your "concept" of "veganism" BUT take exception to comparing "veganism" to a "religion". I could write a book about "religions" and there are over 1500 in America alone. "Veganism" is a lifestyle choice that involves what you eat. It is not a "religion", i.e. "the belief in and worship of a superhuman controlling power, esp. a personal God or gods." By calling "veganism" a religion, you are "alienating" everyone who believes in their "religion" to consider "veganism" as a lifestyle for what they should choose to eat. I don't think that is your goal. :crybaby:

Hi rkeinc, thanks for your thoughts on this subject. If you go back and read my original post, you will note that I never actually compared veganism to religion, and in the title of this thread I have put the word religion in quotes so as to indicate the metaphorical reference between the concept of religion and veganism. I was actually expressing my reaction to an article in the McDougall newsletter where Dr. McDougall talks about how passionate people can become over the dietary choices we and others make, much like the passion people have surrounding religion. I felt his comments used religion as a metaphor in this instance, and I could totally relate to his observations.
See how I am McDougallizing the recipes in
Robin Roberston's "1000 Vegan Recipes" -
http://testing-1000vr.blogspot.com
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Re: The "Religion" of Veganism

Postby rkeinc » Mon Dec 02, 2013 1:29 pm

Thanks for your "clarification". I'm glad that you were being metaphorical and not literal. The bottom line is that we agree to the importance of being a vegan. Unfortunately, we are "preaching to the choir" at Dr. McDougall's site and need to help the world around us to learn/understand/benefit from the concept. Good luck and how did you "survive" at your Thanksgiving Day feast this year? :-D
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Re: The "Religion" of Veganism

Postby Becky » Tue Dec 03, 2013 6:51 pm

rkeinc wrote:Thanks for your "clarification". I'm glad that you were being metaphorical and not literal. The bottom line is that we agree to the importance of being a vegan. Unfortunately, we are "preaching to the choir" at Dr. McDougall's site and need to help the world around us to learn/understand/benefit from the concept. Good luck and how did you "survive" at your Thanksgiving Day feast this year? :-D

Thanksgiving was a breeze! There were 18 people at our gathering (13 adults, and 6 children). Four of us adults selected to eat plant based foods, so our "different" foods included a crock pot Tofurkey roast, vegan gravy, and vegan pumpkin pie. The person who brought the requisite green bean casserole made two versions, one being vegan. There were other dishes that were plant based as prepared, so there was plenty to choose from, and plenty to eat. No doubt a feast day, though, with many of the foods being richer than normal, and the volume of food being higher than normal.
How about you, rkeinc, how did you do?
See how I am McDougallizing the recipes in
Robin Roberston's "1000 Vegan Recipes" -
http://testing-1000vr.blogspot.com
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